[Serf] Hypertext Medieval Glossary
P
[Serf]
Search NetSERF

NetSERF Features

Medieval Glossary
Advanced Search

Random Medieval Site

New to NetSERF
Top 10 NetSERF Sites
Top 10 NetSERF Sections
Link to NetSERF


Top Medieval Sites
ORB
Internet Medieval Sourcebook
Labyrinth




Follow NetSERFMedieval on Twitter





Click here to find great
medieval books for sale.

In Association with Amazon.com

  Home: Hypertext Medieval Glossary: P Bookmark and Share
[A   B   C   D   E   F   G   H   I   J   K   L   M   N   O   P   Q   R   S   T   U   V   W   X   Y   Z]


Pacing Horse:


Padstone:
1) Stone on which a timber post is set.
   (Kenyon, John R. Medieval Fortifications, 211)

2) A large flat-topped stone on which a timber upright or cruck could be placed instead of putting the post directly in to the ground.
   (Beresford, Maurice and Hurst, John. Wharram Percy: Deserted Medieval Village, 137)


Palatinate:
In England, a county in which the tenant in chief exercises powers normally reserved for the king, including the exclusive right to appoint justiciar, hold courts of chancery and exchequer, and to coin money. The kings writ is not valid in a County Palatinate.
   (MEDIEV-L. Medieval Terms)

Related terms: County Palatine / Count Palatine


Palefridus:
A palfrey, the finest sort of riding horse, as opposed to a warhorse. The word is derived from paraveredus, but like caballus it has gone up in the world.
   (Davis, R.H.C. The Medieval Warhorse: Origin, Development and Redevelopment, 137)

Related terms: Palfrey


Palfrey:
A riding horse.
   (Prestwich, Michael. Armies and Warfare in the Middle Ages: The English Experience, 348)

Related terms: Palefridus


Palisade:
1) Strong timber fence, usually set on an earth rampart.
   (Kenyon, John R. Medieval Fortifications, 211)

2) A sturdy wooden fence usually built to enclose a site until a permanent stone wall can be constructed.
   (MEDIEV-L. Medieval Terms)

Related terms: Castle


Panipersebast:
A Byzantine court title just below that of caesar.
   (Fine, John V.A. Jr. The Late Medieval Balkans, 624)


Pannage:
1) Pasturage of pigs in woods; payment for that pasturage.
   (Bennett, Judith M. Women in the Medieval English Countryside, 234)

2) Fee to allow pigs to feed on forest mast.
   (Gies, Frances and Joseph. Life in a Medieval Village, 245)


Pantile:
Roofing tile of curved S-shaped section.
   (Beresford, Maurice and Hurst, John. Wharram Percy: Deserted Medieval Village, 138)


Pantler:
Master of the pantry.
   (Seward, Desmond. Henry V: The Scourge of God, 223)

Related terms: Pantry


Pantry:
Storeroom for bread and other foodstuffs.
   (Kenyon, John R. Medieval Fortifications, 211)

Related terms: Castle / Pantler


Papal Provisions:


Parapet:
Protective wall at the top of a fortification, around the outer side of the wall-walk.
   (Gies, Joseph and Francis. Life in a Medieval Castle, 226)

Related terms: Castle


Paraveredus:
A post-horse (second to ninth centuries); subsequently the word developed in Latin as palefridus, while it also passed into German as das Pferd, the ordinary word for horse.
   (Davis, R.H.C. The Medieval Warhorse: Origin, Development and Redevelopment, 137)


Parchemin:
Parchment panel, kindred to linenfold. Here the central rib branches to the four corners, stopped by ogival curves.
   (Wood, Margaret. The English Medieval House, 413)


Pariage:
Partnership between equals to colonize land or establish a new town.
   (Duby, Georges. Rural Economy and Country Life in the Medieval West, 555)


Parier:
Partner, associate.
   (Duby, Georges. Rural Economy and Country Life in the Medieval West, 555)


Parish:
Generally a subdivision of a diocese; administered by a resident priest who might have other clergy as his assistants; it was the basic unit of ordinary church life in western Europe.
   (Lynch, Joseph H. The Medieval Church: A Brief History, 363)


Parlement:
Supreme court of appeal in the kingdom of France, situated at the Palais de Justice in Paris.
   (Seward, Desmond. Henry V: The Scourge of God, 223)


Parlour:
Private sitting-room on ground floor, often under the solar, in the later Middle Ages.
   (Wood, Margaret. The English Medieval House, 413)


Paroikos: [paroikoi (pl.)]
The Greek term used for dependent peasants in the Later Byzantine Empire.
   (Fine, John V.A. Jr. The Late Medieval Balkans, 625)


Parson:
The rector of a church.
   (Heath, Peter. Church and Realm, 1272-1461, 635)

Related terms: Parsonage


Parsonage:
The house occupied by a rector (rectory) or vicar (vicarage).
   (Beresford, Maurice and Hurst, John. Wharram Percy: Deserted Medieval Village, 138)

Related terms: Parson


Patarin:
A name first used for certain Church reformers in Milan allied to Pope Gregory VII. Later the term came to be applied to dualist heretics in Italy who were part of the Cathar movement. The name then came to be used by Italians and Dalmatians, when writing in Latin, to describe members of the Bosnian Church, even though those Churchmen do not seem to have been dualists.
   (Fine, John V.A. Jr. The Late Medieval Balkans, 625)


Patera: [Paterae (pl.)]
Flat ornament, usually a square four-petalled flower, or four-lobed leaf, used in cornice, frieze and mouldings.
   (Wood, Margaret. The English Medieval House, 413)


Pâtis:
Protection money levied by troops on local population.
   (Seward, Desmond. Henry V: The Scourge of God, 223)


Patriarch:
A major bishop who was the independent head of a major diocese. In the Early Church (from the mid-fifth century) there were five recognized patriarchates: Rome, Constantinople, Alexandria, Antioch, and Jerusalem. After they became autocephalous the Bulgarian and Serbian Churches sought and at times unilaterally assumed this title for the heads of their Churches. At time through pressure they even received recognition for their patriarchial titles from the Constantinopolitan patriarch.
   (Fine, John V.A. Jr. The Late Medieval Balkans, 625)


Patrician: [Patriciate]
Used by modern historians to describe the governing classes of medieval towns, especially during the twelfth and thirteenth centuries.
   (Reynolds, Susan. An Introduction to the History of English Medieval Towns, 199)

Related terms: Patriciate


Patriciate:
The collective, often closed, group of elite merchant families who controlled the affairs of many Dalmatian towns.
   (Fine, John V.A. Jr. The Late Medieval Balkans, 625)

Related terms: Patrician


Patron:
The founder of a church, or the founder's descendant or successor, in whom was vested the right to present to a parish living, or - in the case of a religious house - various rights including that of consenting to the election of the head of the house.
   (Heath, Peter. Church and Realm, 1272-1461, 365)


Pauldron:
Large curved plate worn in pairs to protect the front and rear of the shoulder, replacing the spaudler at the end of the fourteenth century.
   (Wise, Terence. Medieval Warfare, 250)

Related terms: Armor


Paulicians:
Member of a religious sect, seen as heretical by the Orthodox Church, arising in Armenia and eastern Anatolia. Long considered to be dualist, the Paulicians have recently been shown to have been Adoptionists. After being defeated by the Byzantines, many Paulicians were transferred to Thrace and the Rhodopes to defend the border with Bulgaria, where (centered in Philippopolis) many continued to retain their beliefs and practices.
   (Fine, John V.A. Jr. The Late Medieval Balkans, 625)


Pavage:
A toll charged to pay for the paving of a town's streets, or some of them.
   (Reynolds, Susan. An Introduction to the History of English Medieval Towns, 199)


Pavise:
1) Large, free-standing shield on hinged support used by archers and crossbowmen as protection when shooting.
   (Seward, Desmond. Henry V: The Scourge of God, 223)

2) Large rectangular shield carried by spearmen or shield bearers (pavisers) and used to provide cover for crossbowmen.
   (Wise, Terence. Medieval Warfare, 250)

Related terms: Armor


Peace of God:
A movement that arose in southern France in the tenth and eleventh centuries to place limits on fighting; it placed certain classes of people - non-combatants, women, clergy and the poor - under the protection of the church and threatened those who used violence against them with excommunication.
   (Lynch, Joseph H. The Medieval Church: A Brief History, 364)

Related terms: Truce of God


Peculiar:
In the law of the Church: a jurisdiction proper to itself, exempt from and not subject to the jurisdiction of the bishop of the diocese.
   (Warren, W.L. Henry II, 635)


Pediment:
Triangular low-pitched gable over classical portico, or over doorways, windows, etc.
   (Wood, Margaret. The English Medieval House, 413)


Penitentiary:
The official of the papal court responsible for overseeing the processing of the majority of dispensations.
   (Swanson. , 367)


Pent Roof:
Lean-to roof.
   (Kenyon, John R. Medieval Fortifications, 211)

Related terms: Pentice


Pentice: [Pentise, Penthouse]
1) Lean-to building or covered passage or gallery.
   (Wood, Margaret. The English Medieval House, 413)

2) A covered way with open sides to enable people to walk between separate buildings in the dry when it is raining.
   (Beresford, Maurice and Hurst, John. Wharram Percy: Deserted Medieval Village, 138)

Related terms: Pent Roof


Perambulation:
Delimitation of forest boundaries.
   (Sayles, George O. The King's Parliament of England, 145)


Petition:
A) Request, orally or in writing; B) written complaint presented to court of law, in particular to parliament.
   (Sayles, George O. The King's Parliament of England, 145)

Related terms: Bill


Peytral:
Breastplate for a horse.
   (Wise, Terence. Medieval Warfare, 250)


Pier:
Mass of masonry, as distinct from a column, from which an arch springs. Also used, less correctly, for pillar or column in Gothic architecture.
   (Wood, Margaret. The English Medieval House, 413)

Note: petra (Latin) = rock


Pike:
Long spear with small iron head.
   (Wise, Terence. Medieval Warfare, 250)


Pilaster:
Shallow rectangular pier attached to wall.
   (Wood, Margaret. The English Medieval House, 413)


Pilgrimage:
A journey to a holy place for the purpose of worship or thanksgiving or doing penance; there were many local, regional and universal sites that drew pilgrims in the Middle Ages; among the greatest pilgrim destinations were the places connected with Jesus's life in the Holy Land, the city of Rome and the shire of St James at Compostela.
   (Lynch, Joseph H. The Medieval Church: A Brief History, 364)


Pinfold: [Punfold]
1) The lord's pound for stray animals.
   (Gies, Frances and Joseph. Life in a Medieval Village, 245)

2) A place for confining stray or impounded cattle, horse, etc.; a pound.
   (Bennett, H.S. Life on the English Manor: A Study of Peasant Conditions, 1150-1400, 338)


Pipe Roll:
1) Annual roll of the accounts presented at the Exchequer by the sheriffs, and including the farms of the shires and boroughs.
   (Reynolds, Susan. An Introduction to the History of English Medieval Towns, 199)

2) Properly known as The Great Roll of the Exchequer: the record of the annual audit of the accounts of the sheriffs and of other debtors to the Crown.
   (Warren, W.L. Henry II, 635)


Piscina:
1) In a chapel, basin with a drain for washing the vessels after Mass.
   (Kenyon, John R. Medieval Fortifications, 211)

2) Built-in stone basin near altar for washing the chalice. Derives from Latin piscis = fish, and first used for a fish-pond.
   (Wood, Margaret. The English Medieval House, 413)


Pittancer:
An officer of a religious house who had the duty of distributing charitable gifts or allowances of food.
   (Bennett, H.S. Life on the English Manor: A Study of Peasant Conditions, 1150-1400, 338)


Placate:
Narrow plate rising to a point in the middle of the top edge, worn below a shortened breastplate to allow more flexibility.
   (Wise, Terence. Medieval Warfare, 250)


Placia:
Plot of land.
   (Bennett, Judith M. Women in the Medieval English Countryside, 234)


Plaintiff:
An aggrieved person who initiates an action in court.
   (Hogue, Arthur R. Origins of the Common Law, 257)

Related terms: Defendant


Plank-and-Muntin:
A partition of vertical posts (muntins) tenoned into sill and moulded beam, forming a framework into which long panels were set, their edge tapered to fit into a groove (or rebate) in the muntin.
   (Wood, Margaret. The English Medieval House, 413)


Plate Armor:
See: Armor


Plate Tracery:


Plea:
Action at law, recorded on "plea roll" of court.
   (Sayles, George O. The King's Parliament of England, 145)


Pleas of the Crown:
The more serious crimes, breaches of the king's peace, and specially designated offences such as concealment of treasure trove, jurisdiction over which could be exercised by no one except officers of the Crown.
   (Warren, W.L. Henry II, 635)


Pledge:
Legal guaranty; a person who guaranteed that another would meet a legal obligation.
   (Bennett, Judith M. Women in the Medieval English Countryside, 234)

Related terms: Pledging


Pledging:
Legal instituion by which one villager served as guaranty for another's court appearanec, veracity, good conduct, payment of a debt, etc.
   (Gies, Frances and Joseph. Life in a Medieval Village, 245)

Related terms: Pledge


Plenarty:
The question of whether or not a benefice was filled.
   (Heath, Peter. Church and Realm, 1272-1461, 365)


Plenitude of Power:
The plenitudo potestatis or the papal claim to sovereignty over the clergy and church property.
   (Heath, Peter. Church and Realm, 1272-1461, 365)

Related terms: Provide


Plinth:
Projecting base of a wall (or columns).
   (Kenyon, John R. Medieval Fortifications, 211)

Related terms: Castle


Plough Team:
Often assessed at eight oxen per team; in the richest agricultural areas, like the Severn valley, there were between three and five per square mile. On harsher land like the fringes of Dartmoor, a smallholder might own only one or two oxen.
   (Wood, Michael. Domesday: A Search for the Roots of England, 214)


Ploughland:
Amount of potential arable land on an estate (that is, the number of ploughs there was scope for) expressed as a tax assessment which varied according to regional conditions and class of soil.
   (Wood, Michael. Domesday: A Search for the Roots of England, 214)


Pluralism:
1) The holding by one person of more than one church office or benefice at the same time; it was a favourite way for secular and church officials to support their bureaucrats; in the later Middle Ages it was a widespread abuse.
   (Lynch, Joseph H. The Medieval Church: A Brief History, 364)

2) The practice of holding more than one benefice at a time, often leading to absenteeism.
   (Waugh, Scott. England in the Reign of Edward III, 238)

3) The holding of two or more benefices simultaneously, either within the limits approved by the law of the church or without them (when it required a dispensation or was punishable).
   (Heath, Peter. Church and Realm, 1272-1461, 365)


Podesta: [potestas]
A deputy appointed to govern a town or community by a superior, e.g., in the 1250s the Hungarian Ban of Dalmatia appointed a podesta in each town to represent him.
   (Fine, John V.A. Jr. The Late Medieval Balkans, 625)


Pointed Arch:


Pole-Axe:
1) Combined axe and half-pike, with axe blade balanced by hammer head on five-foot metal shaft.
   (Seward, Desmond. Henry V: The Scourge of God, 223)

2) Staff weapon with axe-head, balanced by a rear spike or hammer head and with spikes at the top and bottom of the haft. Used by dismounted knights.
   (Wise, Terence. Medieval Warfare, 250)

Related terms: Halberd


Poledrus:
A colt (fifth to ninth centuries).
   (Davis, R.H.C. The Medieval Warhorse: Origin, Development and Redevelopment, 137)


Poleyn:
1) Small piece of plate armour protecting the knee.
   (Prestwich, Michael. Armies and Warfare in the Middle Ages: The English Experience, 348)

2) Small plate defence covering the knee cap and extending down the shin.
   (Wise, Terence. Medieval Warfare, 250)

Related terms: Armor


Pommel:
Knob at the top of a sword-hilt, counterbalancing the weight of the blade.
   (Wise, Terence. Medieval Warfare, 250)


Pondbreche:
Illegal rescue of impounded animals.
   (Bennett, Judith M. Women in the Medieval English Countryside, 234)


Pone:
A writ, whereby an action could be removed from the county court into the royal court.
   (Bennett, H.S. Life on the English Manor: A Study of Peasant Conditions, 1150-1400, 339)


Pontage:
A toll charged to pay for the building or repair of a bridge.
   (Reynolds, Susan. An Introduction to the History of English Medieval Towns, 199)


Pope:
Derived from papa, "father"; originally a term for any bishop; in the west it came to be restricted to the bishop of Rome, who was the successor of St Peter, was regarded as the chief bishop of the church; in the west, the pope became the dominant figure in the governance of the church; in the Orthodox churches that position of dominance was rejected.
   (Lynch, Joseph H. The Medieval Church: A Brief History, 364)


Port: [portus (Latin)]
A trading-place, not necessarily for water-borne trade, whose inhabitants were in O.E. portware or portmenn. Thus sometimes used as a synonym of "borough" or "town". Portmoot or portmanmoot remained a common name for a town court. By the thirteenth century the town councillors were sometimes called portmen (or chief portmen).
   (Reynolds, Susan. An Introduction to the History of English Medieval Towns, 199)


Portcullis:
1) Vertical sliding wooden grille shod with iron suspended in front of a gateway, let down to protect the gate.
   (Gies, Joseph and Francis. Life in a Medieval Castle, 226)

2) Ironshod wooden grating, a movable gate for defence, rising or falling in vertical grooves in the jambs of a gateway.
   (Wood, Margaret. The English Medieval House, 413)

Note: porte coulis (French) = sliding door
Related terms: Castle


Postern:
1) Secondary gate or door.
   (Gies, Joseph and Francis. Life in a Medieval Castle, 226)

2) Small gateway, secondary to the main entrance.
   (Kenyon, John R. Medieval Fortifications, 211)

Related terms: Castle / Sally-Port


Poundage:
Customs duty on weight of all imports and exports save bullion.
   (Seward, Desmond. Henry V: The Scourge of God, 224)


Pourpoint:
Quilted doublet.
   (Seward, Desmond. Henry V: The Scourge of God, 224)

Related terms: Armor


Praemunientes:
Clause in parliamentary writ of summons to bishops, "requiring" them to summon to parliament representatives of the lower clergy.
   (Sayles, George O. The King's Parliament of England, 145)


Praemunire:
Name of the writ and of two English statutes (of 1353 and 1393) which threatened severe penalties for those who sued in church courts on matters which were deemed to be subject to the king's authority.
   (Heath, Peter. Church and Realm, 1272-1461, 365)


Praitor:
Governor of the late-twelfth-century combined theme of central Greece and the Peloponnesus. By then the office had become chiefly a civil one. The holders were often absentees.
   (Fine, John V.A. Jr. The Late Medieval Balkans, 625)

Related terms: Praktor


Praktor:
A high financial official responsible for assessing and collecting taxes in the late twelfth century in the combined Greek theme. The praktor acted as governor in the absence of the praitor.
   (Fine, John V.A. Jr. The Late Medieval Balkans, 625)

Related terms: Praitor


Prebend:
1) Cathedral benefice set aside for support of member of chapter.
   (Frame, Robin. Colonial Ireland, 1169-1369, 144)

2) A benefice in a cathedral chapter designed to support one of the members of the chapter with income supplied by a manor belonging to the cathedral.
   (Waugh, Scott. England in the Reign of Edward III, 238)

3) The endowment and income of a cathedral or collegiate canonry; could be estates or parish churches and their estates or even a fixed cash sum. Hence often a synonym for canonry, and a canon was often referred to as a prebendary.
   (Heath, Peter. Church and Realm, 1272-1461, 366)

Related terms: Prebendary


Prebendary:
Holder of a prebend, therefore usually a secular canon.
   (Heath, Peter. Church and Realm, 1272-1461, 366)

Related terms: Prebend


Precedent:
A judicial decision or procedure, serving as a guide for the future settlement of similar cases.
   (Hogue, Arthur R. Origins of the Common Law, 257)


Predella:
A row of small pictures at base of a large altarpiece.
   (Martindale, Andrew. Gothic Art, 269)


Prelate:
Archbishop, bishop or head of a religious house.
   (Heath, Peter. Church and Realm, 1272-1461, 366)


Presentee:
Candidate nominated by the patron for appointment to a benefice.
   (Heath, Peter. Church and Realm, 1272-1461, 366)


Presentment:
Statement made by a sworn jury.
   (Bennett, Judith M. Women in the Medieval English Countryside, 234)


President:
Principal judicial officer of the parlement at Paris.
   (Seward, Desmond. Henry V: The Scourge of God, 224)


Prest:
An advance, usually against wages.
   (Prestwich, Michael. Armies and Warfare in the Middle Ages: The English Experience, 348)


Priest: [Presbyter]
A man who held the second highest of the holy orders, after that of bishop and above that of deacon; term derived from the Greek word presbuteros, "elder".
   (Lynch, Joseph H. The Medieval Church: A Brief History, 364)


Primogeniture:
1) The right of the eldest son to inherit the estate or office of his father.
   (MEDIEV-L. Medieval Terms)

2) System of inheritance by which the first-born son succeeds to all his father's landed property.
   (Frame, Robin. Colonial Ireland, 1169-1369, 144)


Principal Rafters:
The pair of inclined timbers that also serve as enlarged common rafters (box frame derivation).
   (Wood, Margaret. The English Medieval House, 414)

Related terms: Common Rafters / Rafters, Common


Principals:
The main inclined timbers of a roof truss on which rest the purlins which support the common rafters (cruck frame carpentry).
   (Wood, Margaret. The English Medieval House, 414)


Prior:
In Benedictine monasteries, the second in command after the abbot; also a term for the head of a religious house that did not have the legal status of a monastery.
   (Lynch, Joseph H. The Medieval Church: A Brief History, 364)

Related terms: Priory


Priory:
Any religious house administered by a prior or prioress. If the prior was subject to a resident abbot, the house is called an abbey or monastery. The title prioress is held in certain religious houses for women.
   (MEDIEV-L. Medieval Terms)

Related terms: Prior


Private Church:
A church owned by a landlord or a monastery; most rural churches were founded by the owner of the land on which they stood and remained under the control of his family; sometimes called a proprietary church.
   (Lynch, Joseph H. The Medieval Church: A Brief History, 364)


Proctor:
1) Equivalent in civil or canon law to attorney.
   (Sayles, George O. The King's Parliament of England, 145)

2) Sworn representative empowered to commit his principal, as in law suits; also elected representative of lesser clergy in parliament and in convocation.
   (Heath, Peter. Church and Realm, 1272-1461, 366)

Related terms: Canon Lawyer


Prohibitions:
Writs suspending cases in, and removing them from, ecclesiastical courts for consideration in the king's court.
   (Heath, Peter. Church and Realm, 1272-1461, 366)


Pronoia:
In the Byzantine Empire (and later in Bulgaria and Serbia) a grant of an income source (usually land) given in exchange for service (usually military) to the state. The pronoia reverted to the state when the holder died or ceased to perform the services for which it had been assigned. In time the grants tended to become hereditary, but the service obligations remained.
   (Fine, John V.A. Jr. The Late Medieval Balkans, 625)

Related terms: Pronoiar


Pronoiar:
The holder of a pronoia.
   (Fine, John V.A. Jr. The Late Medieval Balkans, 625)

Related terms: Pronoia


Protos of Mount Athos:
The chief elder or first monk of Mount Athos.
   (Fine, John V.A. Jr. The Late Medieval Balkans, 625)


Protostrator:
A high Byzantine court title which occasionally was granted to foreign leaders. Choniates, writing in the early thirteenth century, equates it with the Latin title of Marshall.
   (Fine, John V.A. Jr. The Late Medieval Balkans, 625)


Protovestiar:
The title of a Byzantine palace official in charge of the imperial wardrobe. The title was taken over by the South Slavs. Though it is not certain what the functions of the Slavic protovestiars were, they seem to have been some sort of finanical official.
   (Fine, John V.A. Jr. The Late Medieval Balkans, 625)


Provide:
Direct papal appointment to a benefice, dignity or bishopric, overridding local patrons and electors, and based on the theory of the papal plenitude of power.
   (Heath, Peter. Church and Realm, 1272-1461, 366)

Related terms: Plenitude of Power / Provision


Province:
Usually referring to a group of bishoprics subordinate to a metropolitan or archbishop; some religious orders, particularly the friars, were also organized into provinces.
   (Heath, Peter. Church and Realm, 1272-1461, 366)


Provision:
The resulting appointment when a pope exercised his right to provide.
   (Heath, Peter. Church and Realm, 1272-1461, 366)

Related terms: Provisions, Papal / Provisors / Provide


Provisions, Papal:
1) The arrangement whereby the papacy claimed authority to nominate and appoint to any benefice within the Catholic Church, mandating the local ecclesiastical authorities to grant possession of the post. The appropriate mandates were in two different forms: (I) in forma pauperum, whereby the recipient was given the right to demand nomination to any benefice in the gift of a named patron (in England almost invariably an ecclesiastical institution); (II) in forma speciali, whereby the recipient was nominated to a specified post (used especially for cathedral prebends and bishoprics).
   (Swanson. , 367)

2) Nomination or appointment to a church office; in the fourteenth century the papacy gained the right of provision over thousands of church offices all over Europe.
   (Lynch, Joseph H. The Medieval Church: A Brief History, 364)

Related terms: Provisors / Provision / Papal Provisions


Provisors:
1) Those holding papal "provisions" or appointments to ecclesiastical office.
   (Sayles, George O. The King's Parliament of England, 145)

2) Also referred to the title of the English statutes of 1351, 1365 and 1390 which attempted to limit the exercise of papal provision in England.
   (Heath, Peter. Church and Realm, 1272-1461, 366)

Related terms: Provision / Provisions, Papal


Provost:
1) Feudal or royal magistrate.
   (Gies, Joseph and Francis. Life in a Medieval Castle, 230)

2) Royal officer responsible for overseeing administration of justice.
   (Seward, Desmond. Henry V: The Scourge of God, 224)


Pullus:
A colt or foal.
   (Davis, R.H.C. The Medieval Warhorse: Origin, Development and Redevelopment, 137)


Pultrella:
A filly.
   (Davis, R.H.C. The Medieval Warhorse: Origin, Development and Redevelopment, 137)


Purlin:
Longitudinal horizontal beam.
   (Wood, Margaret. The English Medieval House, 414)


Purlin, Butt:
One interrupted by trusses at bay intervals, received on the sides of the principal rafters (box frame carpentry system).
   (Wood, Margaret. The English Medieval House, 414)


Purlin, Collar:
1) One supporting a collar, or collars.
   (Wood, Margaret. The English Medieval House, 414)

2) Horizontal longitudinal beam supporting collar.
   (Wood, Margaret. The English Medieval House, 411)


Purlin, Side:
One supporting the common rafters, part way up the slope of a pitched roof and carried by roof-trusses, partitions and end walls.
   (Wood, Margaret. The English Medieval House, 414)


Purlin, Through:
One running uninterruptedly from end to end of building, carried on the backs of principals (cruck frame derivation).
   (Wood, Margaret. The English Medieval House, 414)


Purpresture:
1) Illegal enclosure or encroachment.
   (Bennett, Judith M. Women in the Medieval English Countryside, 234)

2) Glanvill, IX, ii: "There is said to be a purpresture when anything is occupied unjustly against the sovereign, as in the royal demesne, or by obstructing the public highway, or by impeding a public water course."
   (Warren, W.L. Henry II, 636)


Purveyance:
1) The king's right to requisition food and goods in return for payment. Purveyances were made to supply the royal household and households of the royal family members in ordinary times as well as to supply royal armies in wartime.
   (Waugh, Scott. England in the Reign of Edward III, 238)

2) Exaction of provisions, especially for the king's household.
   (Sayles, George O. The King's Parliament of England, 145)


Putlog Hole:
A hole intentionally left in the surface of a wall for insertion of a horizontal pole.
   (MEDIEV-L. Medieval Terms)

Related terms: Castle


Putto:
A cherubic naked body.
   (Martindale, Andrew. Gothic Art, 269)


Pytel:
A small field or enclosure; a close.
   (Bennett, H.S. Life on the English Manor: A Study of Peasant Conditions, 1150-1400, 339)



[A   B   C   D   E   F   G   H   I   J   K   L   M   N   O   P   Q   R   S   T   U   V   W   X   Y   Z]

----------

To help defray the costs of maintaining NetSERF, we have added these Google ads.

----------