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Jack:
1) Defensive leather coat, either of several layers or quilted, often reinforced with metal studs or small plates.
   (Seward, Desmond. Henry V: The Scourge of God, 223)

2) Canvas or leather jacket reinforced by metal or horn plates stitched between the layers of material.
   (Wise, Terence. Medieval Warfare, 249)

Related terms: Armor / Brigandine


Jamb:
Side of doorway, window, fireplace, etc.
   (Wood, Margaret. The English Medieval House, 412)

Related terms: Shafted Jambs


Janissary:
Derived from Yeni ├žeri, literally, the "new corps"; a member of a very effective Turkish infantry corps, armed with fire-arms. Its members were originally drawn from the devsirme (the child) levy.
   (Fine, John V.A. Jr. The Late Medieval Balkans, 623)

Related terms: Devsirme


Jennet: [Genet, ginet (French), jineta (Spanish)]
A small Spanish horse; also a light horseman.
   (Davis, R.H.C. The Medieval Warhorse: Origin, Development and Redevelopment, 136)


Jetty:
Overhanging upper storey.
   (Wood, Margaret. The English Medieval House, 412)


Joggling:
Stepping (or scalloping, etc.) of adjoining stones to prevent slipping.
   (Wood, Margaret. The English Medieval House, 412)


Joist:
One of parallel timbers stretched from wall to wall, to support the floor-boards. Laid flat earlier, from the later 17th century laid on edge.
   (Wood, Margaret. The English Medieval House, 412)


Journeyman:
A wage-worker, generally assumed to be one who has served out an apprenticeship.
   (Reynolds, Susan. An Introduction to the History of English Medieval Towns, 199)

Related terms: Guild


Jowl:
The enlarged head or foot of a timber, usually a vertical post, frequently used where two members, e.g. top-plate and tie-beam, were to be joined to the post.
   (Wood, Margaret. The English Medieval House, 412)


Judge Delegate:
Appointed from the local clergy, usually prelates or dignitaries, to judge locally on behalf of the pope an appeal or case brought before the papal court.
   (Heath, Peter. Church and Realm, 1272-1461, 363)


Jumentum:
A mare; this was the meaning from the eighth century at the latest, but in Classical Latin (and as late as the fourth century) it could denote any form of horse or mule. In the Middle Ages it was not the only Latin word for a mare, equa being equally common.
   (Davis, R.H.C. The Medieval Warhorse: Origin, Development and Redevelopment, 136)


Jupon:
1) Tightly fitted garment worn over armour in the fourteenth century.
   (Prestwich, Michael. Armies and Warfare in the Middle Ages: The English Experience, 348)

2) Short leather tunic worn over chain mail.
   (Seward, Desmond. Henry V: The Scourge of God, 223)

3) Sleeveless, hip-length garment of leather or padded textile worn over a knight's armour and blazoned with his coat of arms.
   (Wise, Terence. Medieval Warfare, 249)

Related terms: Armor


Jurats: [jurati (Latin)]
In a town, the sworn councillors.
   (Reynolds, Susan. An Introduction to the History of English Medieval Towns, 199)


Jury:
In the Middle Ages, a body of men, presumed to know the facts of a case, summoned by a public officer to give upon oath a true answer (verdict) to some question.
   (Hogue, Arthur R. Origins of the Common Law, 256)


Jus Primae Noctis:
The right by which a lord may sleep first night with the bride of a newly married serf, although the custom maybe avoided by the payment of a fine.
   (MEDIEV-L. Medieval Terms)


Justiciar:
1) The head of the royal judicial system and the king's viceroy when absent from the country.
   (MEDIEV-L. Medieval Terms)

2) Regent in England under William I, chief minister until the 1220s.
   (Gies, Joseph and Francis. Life in a Medieval Castle, 230)

3) A high administrative and judicial officer who ruled for the king during his absence abroad and under him on his return.
   (Sayles, George O. The King's Parliament of England, 145)



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