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Icon:
A sacred image or picture of Chirst or a saint; venerated with particular fervour in the Greek Orthodox tradition.
   (Lynch, Joseph H. The Medieval Church: A Brief History, 362)


Iconoclasm:
The destruciton of icons; iconoclasm was a policy of some Byzantine emperors between 725 and 842; eventually repudiated by the Christian churches of the medieval east and west.
   (Lynch, Joseph H. The Medieval Church: A Brief History, 362)


Impost:
Upper course of pilaster, pillar or pier, from which an arch springs.
   (Wood, Margaret. The English Medieval House, 412)


In Partibus Infidelium:
Literally "in the regions of the faithless". Used to designate episcopal sees to which a succession of bishops was maintained by the western church, but for which the actual territories were no longer actually in Latin Christian hands (if the location of the sees was actually known). Titles of this sort were often given to suffragan bishops.
   (Swanson. , 366)


Incumbent:
The rightful holder of a benefice.
   (Heath, Peter. Church and Realm, 1272-1461, 363)


Indenture:
A contract, drawn up in two parts, one to be kept by each party. The two were written on a single piece of parchment, which was then divided by a jagged or indented cut.
   (Prestwich, Michael. Armies and Warfare in the Middle Ages: The English Experience, 348)


Indulgence:
A grant of remission of penance for sins, usually emanating from the pope, but also, on a lesser scale of remission, from bishops; always in return for some specifically required act and on the assumption of full contrition by the recipient.
   (Heath, Peter. Church and Realm, 1272-1461, 363)


Infangenethef:
1) Right to prosecute thieves caught in the act within a territory and to confiscate their goods.
   (Gies, Frances and Joseph. Life in a Medieval Village, 245)

2) Jurisdiction over a thief apprehended within the lord's manor; the right of a lord to try and amerce a thief caught within his manor.
   (Bennett, H.S. Life on the English Manor: A Study of Peasant Conditions, 1150-1400, 338)

Related terms: Outfangenethef


Infidel:
Any one having a strong adversity to Christianity.
   (MEDIEV-L. Medieval Terms)


Infield-Outfield:
A system of cultivation where an infield, usually near to the village was cropped and manured continously while the much larger outfield was divided into portions which were cropped only at intervals.
   (Beresford, Maurice and Hurst, John. Wharram Percy: Deserted Medieval Village, 137)


Inland:
Land exempt from tax.
   (MEDIEV-L. Medieval Terms)

Related terms: Warland


Inner Curtain:


Inner Ward:


Inquest:
Investigation by means of sworn testimony.
   (Sayles, George O. The King's Parliament of England, 145)


Instance Causes:
Causes in which one person sues another in the church courts.
   (Heath, Peter. Church and Realm, 1272-1461, 363)

Related terms: Ex Officio Proceedings


Interdict:
The ecclesiastical banning in an area of all sacraments except for baptism and extreme unction. In general it does not ban high feast days. Used to force persons/institution/community or secular lords to a view dictated by the church/pope.
   (MEDIEV-L. Medieval Terms)


Investiture:
The act of formally putting someone into an office or a landholding; it was a major occasion of dispute in the eleventh and twelfth centuries when reformers opposed lay rulers who invested clergy with the symbols of their positions.
   (Lynch, Joseph H. The Medieval Church: A Brief History, 362)


Islam:
The religion founded by the Arab prophet Mohammed (570-632); an Arabic word meaning "submission to the will of God".
   (Lynch, Joseph H. The Medieval Church: A Brief History, 363)

Related terms: Muslim



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