[Serf] Hypertext Medieval Glossary
G
[Serf]
Search NetSERF

NetSERF Features

Medieval Glossary
Advanced Search

Random Medieval Site

New to NetSERF
Top 10 NetSERF Sites
Top 10 NetSERF Sections
Link to NetSERF


Top Medieval Sites
ORB
Internet Medieval Sourcebook
Labyrinth




Follow NetSERFMedieval on Twitter





Click here to find great
medieval books for sale.

In Association with Amazon.com

  Home: Hypertext Medieval Glossary: G Bookmark and Share
[A   B   C   D   E   F   G   H   I   J   K   L   M   N   O   P   Q   R   S   T   U   V   W   X   Y   Z]


Gabelle:
Tax on salt - a commodity which could only be bought at royal (in Normandy, ducal) depots.
   (Seward, Desmond. Henry V: The Scourge of God, 222)


Gable:
Triangular upper part of the wall at end of a ridged roof.
   (Wood, Margaret. The English Medieval House, 412)

Related terms: Hipped Gable


Gabled Hip:
Hipped roof with small gable above.
   (Wood, Margaret. The English Medieval House, 412)

Related terms: Hipped Gable


Gael:
A name given to Celtic inhabitants of Scotland, Ireland and the Isle of Mann.
   (MEDIEV-L. Medieval Terms)


Gagnage: [bastide]
Enclosed farm on the outskirts of arable area, particularly in the Metz region.
   (Duby, Georges. Rural Economy and Country Life in the Medieval West, 554)

Related terms: Bastide


Gambeson:
Quilted linen jacket stuffed with flax or rags, worn as a body defence by infantry and over the hauberk by poor knights and sergeants.
   (Wise, Terence. Medieval Warfare, 248)

Related terms: Armor


Garderobe:
1) Latrine
   (Gies, Joseph and Francis. Life in a Medieval Castle, 226)

2) A lavatory in the thickness of the wall of a building with a chute leading down to a pit in the ground.
   (Beresford, Maurice and Hurst, John. Wharram Percy: Deserted Medieval Village, 137)

Related terms: Castle


Garrett:
Room within the roof of a house, an attic.
   (Beresford, Maurice and Hurst, John. Wharram Percy: Deserted Medieval Village, 137)


Garrigue:
Heathland in Provence.
   (Duby, Georges. Rural Economy and Country Life in the Medieval West, 554)


Garth:
A small piece of enclosed land next to a house, often a garden.
   (Beresford, Maurice and Hurst, John. Wharram Percy: Deserted Medieval Village, 137)

Related terms: Croft


Gärtner:
All-but landless peasant.
   (Duby, Georges. Rural Economy and Country Life in the Medieval West, 554)


Gasaille:
Livestock lease.
   (Duby, Georges. Rural Economy and Country Life in the Medieval West, 554)

Location: France
Related terms: Soccida


Gasmoule:
An individual of mixed Frank (Latin) and Greek parentage.
   (Fine, John V.A. Jr. The Late Medieval Balkans, 623)


Gatehouse:
The complex of towers, bridges, and barriers built to protect each entrance through a castle or town wall.
   (MEDIEV-L. Medieval Terms)

Related terms: Castle


Gavel: [gablum (Latin), gafol (Old English)]
See: Landgable


Gavelkind:
The name of a form of land-tenure whereby a man's property was divisible among his sons.
   (Bennett, H.S. Life on the English Manor: A Study of Peasant Conditions, 1150-1400, 338)


Geld:
1) The Anglo-Saxon land tax used for military purposes, especially the payment of the royal fleet (geld = payment or tribute in Old English). Hence Danegeld was the tax raised to pay tribute to the Danes in the tenth and early eleventh centuries.
   (Wood, Michael. Domesday: A Search for the Roots of England, 213)

2) A tax paid in the eleventh and twelfth centuries to the king.
   (Reynolds, Susan. An Introduction to the History of English Medieval Towns, 199)

Related terms: Danegeld


Gelding:
A castrated horse. So far as warhorses and good riding horses were concerned, it is broadly true to say that though geldings were used by the Arabs and Tukrs and in Eastern Europe generally, they were little used in the West until the sixteenth century. That is why the French call a gelding a "Hungarian" (hongre) horse, and the Germans call it a Wallachian (Wallach). Marx Fugger (Von der Gestiiterey, Frankfurt-am-Main, 1584, p. 37) quoted Albertus Magnus to the effect that castration made horses timid and therefore unsuited for war, but added that the Turks, Muscovites and Tartars did use geldings and continued to defeat the Christians. Jordanus Ruffus (c. 1256) knew about castration but recommended it only when medically necessary. In medieval England geldings seem to have been used in a lowly way. At the end of the fourteenth century Chaucer disdainfully likened the pardoner to a "geldyng or a mare". In the sixteenth century there was a change; Thomas Blundeville stated that in England light horsemen used geldings in the wars, but added that they were used "partly for their servants to ride on and to craie their male [i.e. trunk] and cloke bagges after them" (Blundeville (1580), bk i, f. 19).
   (Davis, R.H.C. The Medieval Warhorse: Origin, Development and Redevelopment, 135)


Gersum: [Gersuma]
Entry fee for taking possession of a tenancy.
   (Gies, Frances and Joseph. Life in a Medieval Village, 244)


Gesindedienst:
Service from children of the domestic familia.
   (Duby, Georges. Rural Economy and Country Life in the Medieval West, 554)


Gestum:
A guest's portion: an allowance of meat and drink.
   (Bennett, H.S. Life on the English Manor: A Study of Peasant Conditions, 1150-1400, 338)


Ghazi:
A Turkish warrior for the (Islamic) faith.
   (Fine, John V.A. Jr. The Late Medieval Balkans, 623)


Ghegs:
Members of the Albanian ethnic group to which the tribesmen of northern Albania belong.
   (Fine, John V.A. Jr. The Late Medieval Balkans, 623)


Gild:
See: Guild


Gîte:
Right of shelter or maintenance for the lord or his agents.
   (Duby, Georges. Rural Economy and Country Life in the Medieval West, 554)


Gite de Chevaux:
Due levied by lord for stabling horses.
   (Duby, Georges. Rural Economy and Country Life in the Medieval West, 555)


Glagolitic:
The first alphabet worked out by Cyril and Methodius for Slavic. It was soon replaced in most places by the Cyrillic alphabet. However, Glagolitic survived for many centuries in Croatia.
   (Fine, John V.A. Jr. The Late Medieval Balkans, 623)


Glebe:
1) The landed endowment of a parish church.
   (Swanson. , 367)

2) Land assigned to support the parish church.
   (Gies, Frances and Joseph. Life in a Medieval Village, 244)


Gore:
Wedge of arable land created by irregularity of terrain and plowing in strips.
   (Gies, Frances and Joseph. Life in a Medieval Village, 244)


Gorget:
1) A piece of plate armour protecting the neck.
   (Prestwich, Michael. Armies and Warfare in the Middle Ages: The English Experience, 347)

2) Plate defence covering the throat, meeting the breastplate at the shoulders and chest.
   (Wise, Terence. Medieval Warfare, 248)

Related terms: Armor


Gospel:
Originally, the "good news" of Jesus; then a word for certain documents telling of Jesus's life and teachings; there were numerous early Christian gospels of which four - those attributed to Matthew, Mark, Luke and John - were regarded as canonical by the second century.
   (Lynch, Joseph H. The Medieval Church: A Brief History, 362)


Gospodin:
Slavic for a lord. At times borne by the ruler of a state (e.g., George Brankovic for the first years he ruled Serbia).
   (Fine, John V.A. Jr. The Late Medieval Balkans, 623)

Language: Slavic


Gost:
The second highest title in the Bosnian Church, often held by clerics who headed Bosnian Church religious houses.
   (Fine, John V.A. Jr. The Late Medieval Balkans, 623)


Gradarius:
A pacing horse.
   (Davis, R.H.C. The Medieval Warhorse: Origin, Development and Redevelopment, 136)

Related terms: Ambulatorius (equus)


Gramatik:
Among the South Slavs, the title earned by one who had successfully completed a prolonged course in literary study.
   (Fine, John V.A. Jr. The Late Medieval Balkans, 623)


Grand Zupan:
"Grand Count." The title held by the ruler of Raska/Serbia until Stefan Prvovencani assumed the royal title in 1217.
   (Fine, John V.A. Jr. The Late Medieval Balkans, 623)


Grange:
Farm-buildings, usually at a distance from manorial centre.
   (Frame, Robin. Colonial Ireland, 1169-1369, 144)


Grangier: [meyer]
Farmer.
   (Duby, Georges. Rural Economy and Country Life in the Medieval West, 555)

Related terms: Meyer


Gravamina:
Official collective complaints by the clergy about infringements of the church's liberties and rights.
   (Heath, Peter. Church and Realm, 1272-1461, 363)


Great Chamber:
Solar, owner's bed-sittingroom, master bedroom.
   (Wood, Margaret. The English Medieval House, 412)

Related terms: Castle / Great Hall


Great Hall:
The building in the inner ward that housed the main meeting and dining area for the castle's residence.
   (MEDIEV-L. Medieval Terms)

Related terms: Castle / Great Chamber


Greaves:
1) Plate armour pieces protecting the legs.
   (Prestwich, Michael. Armies and Warfare in the Middle Ages: The English Experience, 347)

2) Plate defence for the lower leg.
   (Wise, Terence. Medieval Warfare, 248)

Related terms: Armor


Greek Fire:
Incendiary mixture used primarily in siege warfare.
   (Prestwich, Michael. Armies and Warfare in the Middle Ages: The English Experience, 347)


Green:
An area of common grassland within a village used for grazing.
   (Beresford, Maurice and Hurst, John. Wharram Percy: Deserted Medieval Village, 137)


Grof:
German for a count.
   (Fine, John V.A. Jr. The Late Medieval Balkans, 623)

Language: German


Groin:
The edge formed by intersecting vaults.
   (Wood, Margaret. The English Medieval House, 412)

Related terms: Vault, Groined


Groined Vault:


Grubenhäus: [Grubenhäuser (pl.)]
A small hut dug into the ground, usually with a post hole at each end, typical of the Saxon period. It is debatable whether they were flimsy buildings with floors at the lower level, or whether they were more substantial structures with raised wooden floors and a cavity underneath. They have been given various names, such a sunken hut, sunken-feature building but the latter is very confusing as it is often confused with sunken-floored building. It is preferable to retain the neutral German term for this type of structure.
   (Beresford, Maurice and Hurst, John. Wharram Percy: Deserted Medieval Village, 137)


Guild:
1) A term applied to trade associations. The aims of such association are to protect members from the competition of foreign merchants and maintain commercial standards. The first guilds where merchant guilds, later came craft guilds as industry has gotten more specialized. Guilds maintain a system of education, whereby apprentices serve a master for five to seven years before becoming a journeyman at about age nineteen. Journeymen work in the shop of a master until they can demonstrate to the leaders of his guild that they are ready for master status. Guild members are forbidden to compete with each other, and merchants are required to sell at a "just price".
   (MEDIEV-L. Medieval Terms)

2) A word used in the Middle Ages for associations of many purposes, but nearly always including mutual charity, general sociability (including drinking), and religious celebrations.
   (Reynolds, Susan. An Introduction to the History of English Medieval Towns, 199)

Related terms: Gild / Hanse / Hanseatic League / Journeyman


Gules of August:
The first day of August.
   (Bennett, H.S. Life on the English Manor: A Study of Peasant Conditions, 1150-1400, 338)



[A   B   C   D   E   F   G   H   I   J   K   L   M   N   O   P   Q   R   S   T   U   V   W   X   Y   Z]

----------

To help defray the costs of maintaining NetSERF, we have added these Google ads.

----------